SFL

The Linguistics of Formative Assessment

We know from research how important formative assessment is to instruction and student learning. But sometimes questions and statements we make as teachers fail to elicit a verbal response from students. When this happens, we can try to use non-verbal cues to gauge student understanding for a response. We might also consider how the kinds of language choices we make may not function in ways we intend. Perhaps one of the most notorious phrases that fails to adequately assess students’ formative knowledge is:

(1) Does that make sense?

 
(more…)

4C13 from afar: Twitter & Collaboration

In lieu of a more complete, short essay (coming soon), I offer today a few thoughts on the 2013 Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Twitter is my CCCC News Wire

I get all my news on the conference from the 4C13 hashtag on Twitter. I also have been browsingthe resources uploaded onto the NCTE site for the convention. I’m indebted to the fellow scholars tweeting about it, especially @webbsusa, who tweeted a fascinating talk by Dr. Victor Villanueva entitled: “Toward a Political Economy of Basic Writing Programs.”

Collaboration between Rhet Comp and Education

Villanueva discussed the need for Basic Writing (and Rhet Comp) to engage in more collaboration with other disciplines. While it seems Villanueva may have seen this need as a way to legitimize the course and empower its students, I contend that this collaboration needs to happen because related disciplines have a lot to offer Rhet Comp and vice versa. Education and Linguistics are the first places where more collaboration needs to happen. (more…)

Update

I will be presenting at two conferences this semester. First, I will be presenting with a colleague at the Indiana State English Learner conference, sharing some SFL applications for implementing the Common Core State Standards when teaching writing to English Learners. Secondly, I will be presenting an ecocritical analysis of the lyricism and essays of Rich Mullins at the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature annual conference. Finally, my first publication, co-written with a colleague, will be coming out in June. It is a chapter in the edited volume, Genre Pedagogy Across the Curriculum: Theory and Application in U.S. Classrooms and Contexts. Overall, it is shaping up to be a very productive semester. Cheers!